Help the World, Help Yourself: A Career in Criminal Justice - Geneva College, a Christian College in Pennsylvania (PA)

Geneva College Blog

Menu
RSS Subscribe Print   

Program Spotlight
September 15, 2017

Help the World, Help Yourself: A Career in Criminal Justice

After man’s fall from grace, sin became a reality in the existence of humans. To control sinful behaviors that hurt other people, civilizations throughout millennia created laws and sought dedicated officers to enforce the laws and keep people safe. If you want to join the time-honored tradition of fighting crime, a Criminal Justice degree could put you on that path.

There are myriad ways to fight crime, from becoming an officer or investigator to performing crime scene analyses to helping track and analyze crime-related data. Whether you want to work with criminals or victims, help police departments or government agencies or even step out on your own as a private detective, a Criminal Justice Degree is a great place to start helping the world … and yourself.

 Help the World: Cracking Down on Crime

Sadly, the fallen world is awash in crime. While violent crime had been getting better for half a century, it is now getting worse. TIME reports in January 2017 that violent crime – homicide, robbery, aggravated assault and rape – is once again on the rise in U.S. cities. According to the PEW Research Center, however, “Public perceptions about crime in the U.S. often don’t align with the data,” with citizens reporting perceived increases in crime even when it is actually falling.

This indicates that people still don’t feel safe enough in their own neighborhoods and on their own streets. A Criminal Justice degree can help you play a role to stem the tide of crime waves and make people feel more secure in their persons and property.  A Criminal Justice degree can qualify you to deal with crime such as:

  • Domestic abuse
  • Crime against people with Disabilities
  • White collar crime
  • Substance abuse
  • Hate crime

… and much more. You could start making a difference.

Help Yourself: Launching a Successful Career

A degree in Criminal Justice opens so many doors. You could choose to be a criminal investigator, a police officer, a probation officer, a forensic analyst, a legal assistant, a public safety records specialist, an intelligence analyst, a coroner’s assistant, a victims’ advocate … and the list goes on. A Criminal Justice degree will help you with the pursuit of any facet of criminal investigation or advocacy. Our society needs people who understand the concepts of both justice and mercy.

The jobs in this field pay relatively well, too. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), for instance, legal assistants make an average of $23.80 per hour, which translates to $49,500 per year – and that’s with only an associate’s degree. With a bachelor’s you stand to make considerably more. Likewise, forensic science technicians (who analyze evidence from crime scenes using chemistry, biology and physics) make an average of $56,750 per year or $27.29 per hour, says the BLS.

Jobs in this field are growing steadily, too. While legal assistant positions are remaining relatively stable at 8 percent projected growth between 2014 and 2024, forensic science jobs are exploding, predicted to grow by 27 percent in that same time span. Now is the time to get into the field of Criminal Justice and start down the path to career fulfillment and success.

Learn More About a Criminal Justice Degree Today

With a Bachelor of Professional Studies in Criminal Justice, you will have ready access to all these careers, and more. If that’s not enough, here are even more reasons to get a degree, and other telling statistics to help you make your decision.

If you’d like to learn more about the biblically based, Christ-centered education at Geneva, we’d love to introduce you to Christian perspectives of crime and redemptive justice. For more information on how Geneva College can help you pursue your goals for a career in Criminal Justice, please phone us at 855-979-5563 or email web@geneva.edu.