Geneva College

 

 

Course Descriptions

BIB 112 Biblical Introduction I—Creation to Post-Exilic Period (3)
Introduction to the history of salvation as expressed in the Old Testament, including historical and theological study focused on Israel as the covenant people of God, with special attention on the relationship of the Old Testament to Jesus Christ.

BIB 113 Biblical Introduction II—Intertestamental Period through Apostolic Age (3)
The political, social, and religious background and setting of the New Testament; the Gospels as witness to Jesus Christ; and the development of Christianity in the first century.

BIB 151 Introduction to Biblical Studies (honors) (3)
An introductory Old Testament Bible course for students with a strong Bible background. Prerequisite: Invitation, based on pretest performance.

BIB 152 Introduction to Biblical Studies (honors) (3)
An introductory New Testament Bible course for students with a strong Bible background. Prerequisite: Invitation, based on pretest performance.

BIB 200 How to Read the Bible (3)
This course provides a general overview to the principles of interpretation from a redemptive historical perspective. Fall semester.

BIB 300 Foundations of Christian Thought (3)
Scripturally derived concepts undergirding Christian academic work, and a biblically directed view of the world and of man‘s role in the divinely established order. Prerequisites: BIB 112, BIB 113. Open only to juniors and seniors.

BIB 301 Old Testament Prophecy (3)
Theological and ethical content, with attention to the original life-settings and contemporary relevance of the prophetic literature. Repeatable. Prerequisites: BIB 112, BIB 113, and BIB 200 or permission of the instructor.

BIB 302 Wisdom Literature (3)
The wisdom tradition in Israel and the ancient Near East, with special emphasis on Job, Proverbs, and Ecclesiastes. Approved HUM 304 option. Prerequisites: BIB 112, BIB 113, and BIB 200 or permission of the instructor.

BIB 303 Old Testament Studies (3)
Variable topics in the Old Testament. Gives opportunity to study the book of Psalms or a more in-depth examination of some of the Pentateuch or history books. Repeatable. Prerequisites: BIB 112, BIB 113, and BIB 200 or permission of the instructor.

BIB 304 Psalms (3)
This course explores the biblical book of Psalms under four headings: its ancient Israelite origins, its witness to Israel‘s Old Testament theology, its use in the New Testament, and its use in the Christian prayer and worship. Approved HUM 304 option. Prerequisites: BIB 112/113 or BIB 151/152; BIB 200. Spring semester.

BIB 305 Isaiah (3)
A study of the Old Testament Book of Isaiah, with special attention toward exploring its role in the unfolding of redemptive-history, and how its message and imagery contains key themes that were recognized by the New Testament writers as having been ultimately fulfilled in the Person and Work of Jesus Christ. Approved HUM 304 option. Prerequisites: BIB 112/113 or BIB 151/152; BIB 200. Fall semester.

BIB 306 Daniel (3)
An introduction to Biblical prophecy and the book of Daniel. Prerequisites: BIB 112/113 or BIB 151/152; BIB 200. Spring semester.

BIB 307 Judah‘s Exile and Restoration (3)
A study of Judean history and prophecy from the Babylonian captivity to the return from exile. Approved HUM 304 option. Prerequisites: BIB 112/113 or BIB 151/152; BIB 200. Spring semester.

BIB 308 Luke (3)
A study of the Gospel of Luke. Prerequisites: BIB 112/113 or BIB 151/152; BIB 200.

BIB 309 Revelation (3)
A study of the book of Revelation. Prerequisites: BIB 112/113 or BIB 151/ BIB 200. Fall Semester.

BIB 311 Matthew (3)
A study of the Gospel of Matthew. Prerequisites: BIB 112/113 or BIB 151/152; BIB 200. Fall semester.

BIB 313 John (3)
A study of the Gospel of John. Prerequisites: BIB 112/113 or BIB 151/152; BIB 200. Spring semester.

BIB 315 Acts (3)
A study of the Book of Acts. Prerequisites: BIB 112/113 or BIB 151/152; BIB 200. Fall semester.

BIB 316 Romans (3)
An in-depth study of the Book of Romans. Prerequisites: BIB 112/113 or BIB 151/152; BIB 200.

BIB 317 Ephesians/Pastoral Epistles (3)
A study of Ephesians, its themes and doctrines. Prerequisites: BIB 112/BIB 113, or BIB 151/152; BIB 200. Spring semester.

BIB 318 Hebrews (3)
Studies the setting and theological themes of this major New Testament epistle. Prerequisites: BIB 112/113 or BIB 151/152; BIB 200. Spring semester. 

BIB 322 Calvin‘s Institutes (3)
A survey of the theological concepts in John Calvin‘s Institutes of Christian Religion with an introduction to the life and ministry of John Calvin. Prerequisites: BIB 112, BIB 113 and BIB 200.

BIB 324 Introduction to Reformed Tradition (3)
An introduction to the history and theology of the Reformation, especially as seen in the Westminster Confession of Faith. Approved HUM 304 option. Prerequisites: BIB 112/113 or BIB 151/152; BIB 200. Fall semester.

BIB 325 Biblical Theology (3)
Dominant motifs of Biblical literature, emphasizing Biblical texts, with some review of theological literature and methods. Prerequisites: BIB 112 and BIB 113.

BIB 340 Inter-Testamental Literature (3)
Examines the history, literature, and religious developments of the Jewish people between the close of the Old Testament and the time of Jesus. Prerequisites: BIB 112/113 or BIB 151/152; BIB 200. Fall semester.

BIB 341 Archaeology & Geography of Israel (3)
This course, team taught by faculty in the Bible Department, studies archeology in general, specific archeological sites in Israel, and the historical geography of Israel. This course culminates in a trip to Israel over Christmas Break. Students unable to participate in the travel component of the course may write a research paper. Permission only. Prerequisites: BIB 112, BIB 113.

BIB 350 History of the Christian Church (3)
Origin and spread of Christianity from the time of the apostles to the end of the 1900s, with special emphasis on doctrinal formulations. Prerequisite: HUM 203.

PHI 100 Logic (3)
An introduction to the tools and terminology of logic, various argument forms and common fallacies, including hands-on practice analyzing arguments, in order to improve reasoning skills fundamental to effective communication and critical thinking in every academic discipline and avenue of life. Every year.

PHI 110 Introduction to Philosophy (3)
Designed for the student with little or no background in philosophy, this course surveys the history of Western philosophy, key philosophers, and important philosophical concepts that continue to shape our perception of our selves, our world and God. Philosophy concerns the fundamental questions of life, study, worship and work—What is reality? How do I know what I know? and What is right and good? Every year.

PHI 112 Ethics (3)
Examines the nature of ethical principles, theories and judgments as these have developed historically and provides an analysis of various ethical problems such as abortion, capital punishment, euthanasia, etc.. Attention is given to several major Christian ethicists such as Augustine, Aquinas and Kierkegaard. Suitable as an introduction to philosophy. Spring semester.

PHI 113 C. S. Lewis (3)
Explores Lewis‘ thought through philosophical themes such as, What is morality? What is love? What does it mean to be human? Why does suffering occur? Students in this course will read The Screwtape Letters, The Four Loves, Mere Christianity, The Abolition of Man, and The Problem of Pain.

PHI 200 Plato (3)
Studies Plato‘s major works, including The Republic, Meno and the Apology. This course examines Plato against the backdrop of Pre-Socratic philosophy and engages the central questions raised in philosophy, such as the nature of the good, and of knowledge. Approved HUM 304 option. Fall semester, alternate years.

PHI 202 Augustine (3)
Explores the context and content of Augustine‘s major works, including The City of God, The Confessions and On the Free Choice of the Will. Students learn how to closely read a philosophical text closely and interpret it, applying it to the history of Christendom. Early church fathers and major philosophical figures from late antiquity are examined to provide a context for Augustine‘s work. Approved HUM 304 option. Fall semester.

PHI 204 Aristotle (3)
Studies Aristotle‘s major works, including Nicomachean Ethics, Metaphysics and Politics. Students explore the development of virtue in Aristotle‘s thought and engage in an analysis of the aspects of critical reasoning. Attention is given to subsequent philosophical developments in Ancient Greece and Rome, such as Stoicism. Approved HUM 304 option. Spring semester, alternate years.

PHI 206 Aquinas (3)
Explores the contours of Aquinas‘ thought in Summa Theologica. Attention is given to understanding his views in light of their background in Aristotle. This course examines Aquinas against the background of the major figures in medieval philosophy such as Anselm, Bonaventure and Duns Scotus. Approved HUM 304 option. Spring semester, alternate years.

PHI 214 Business Ethics (3)
Nature of ethical principles and analysis of problems, such as pollution, whistle-blowing, and employee rights.

PHI 300 History of Modern Philosophy (3)
Explores the development of the theory of knowledge and ethics in the early modern period through an analysis of continental rationalism (Descartes, Spinoza, Leibnitz), British empiricism (Hobbes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume) and the American theologian/philosopher Jonathan Edwards. Approved HUM 304 option. Fall semester, alternate years.

PHI 301 Kant (3)
Explores the work of this great 19th century philosopher in the areas of metaphysics, religion, morality and the theory of knowledge. Students read primary texts and examine Kant‘s influence on the subsequent development of philosophy.

PHI 304 Nineteenth-Century Social Philosophers and Pragmatism (3)
Explores the early pragmatist philosophers, C.S. Peirce, William James, and John Dewey through their major philosophical texts. Pragmatism is a uniquely American variety of philosophy that has shaped American cultural life, its educational and political experience. It was the dominant position in the first half of the 20th century and has had a significant revival in modern philosophical discourse principally through the work of neopragmatist Richard Rorty, whose essays will be examined as well.

PHI 305 Contemporary Philosophy: The Analytic Tradition (3)
Examines the work, influence, and value of key philosophers in 20th-Century analytic philosophy, such as Bertrand Russell, Ludwig Wiggenstein, J.L. Austin, and current contributors in this widespread tradition. Of special interest for students in linguistic, language, literary, communication and biblical studies. Every other year.

PHI 306 Postmodern Philosophers (3)
Explores the philosophical antecedents and thought of important contemporary philosophers who represent the philosophical reaction against modernity and the dominance of the Enlightenment paradigm—specifically, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Jean Francois Lyotard, and Richard Rorty. Additionally considers Christian thinkers‘ responses to and appropriation of postmodern thought. Of special interest for students in sociology, literature, Christian and student ministry majors. Every year. Approved HUM 304 option.

PHI 307 Women Philosophers (3)
Exposes the student to the work of important women philosophers such as Marjorie Grene, Simone de Beauvoir, Hannah Arendt, Simone Weil, and Martha Nussbaum, Lorraine Code, Caroline Simon, and Elenore Stump.

PHI 308 Contemporary Continental Philosophy (3)
This course considers major themes of 20th Century Continental Philosophy, through a closer look at the work of important Continental philosophers such as Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty: existence, being-in-the-world, and the lived body. Alternate years.

PHI 309 Kierkegaard and Nietzsche (3)
Course description unavailable at time of printing.

PHI 310 Christian Understanding of Life (3)
This seminar course introduces students to covenant epistemology: an innovative, biblically compatible holistic, epistemological vision which effectively offers a Christian understanding of life. Students‘ interactive exposure to a variety of works which shape and imply this epistemology proves to be personally transformational and profoundly practical. Every year. Approved HUM 304 option.

PHI 318 Philosophies of World Religions (3)
A study of the major religions of the world including Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Confucianism, Islam and Judaism from the vantage point of a Christian world view. Students explore the question of exclusivity (only one religion is true) and what constitutes a religious experience. Approved HUM 304 option. Fall semester, alternate years.

PHI 353 Philosophy of Science (3)
Examines fundamental philosophical questions undergirding and implied by the practice of science, and major positions and debates in contemporary philosophy of science regarding scientific explanation, confirmation, discovery, and the realist or antirealist status of scientific claims. Additional attention will be given to the insights of scientist-turned-philosopher Michael Polanyi, as well as to the implications of Christian commitment for philosophy of science. Of special interest for students in the sciences. Alternate years. Approved HUM 304 option.

PHI 354 Political Philosophy (3)
Studies in the variety of political philosophies of the last 300 years including social contract theory, liberalism, Marxism and socialism, tolerance or pluralism by concentrating on the major theories with a view toward contemporary analysis and criticism. Cross-listed as POL 309 and offered periodically.

PHI 355, Philosophy for Theology (3)
Explores philosophical developments and discussions which have proven germane and valuable in service to the recent theological enterprise, e.g., hermeneutics, deconstruction, speech act theory, and reformed epistemology. Alternate years.

PHI 356 Knowledge and Reality (3)
This course will explore the major theories and issues involved in metaphysics and contemporary epistemology.

PHI 410 Senior Seminar (3)
This course is designed for philosophy majors and minors to study a contemporary or historical philosophical topic in-depth. Students will learn to do advanced research in philosophy and will write a major paper in the process. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

PHI 430 Philosophy of History (3)
Nature of historical knowledge and great speculative theories, such as those of Augustine, Hegel, Marx, and Toynbee with an attempt at a Christian critique. Alternate years.


 

Point of Excellence

The first biopsychology major graduated in 2012 and has been hired as an IOM Tech in UPMC’s Center for Clinical Neurophysiology (CCN).

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Upcoming Events
Dec06
The Genevans Christmas "Glad Tidings" Concert
1st Presbyterian Church, Beaver Falls 7:00 p.m.

ARTS & CULTURE
The Genevans welcomes Christmas season with “Glad Tidings!”
The ensemble will perform its annual Christmas concerts on Dec. 5 and 6.
CURRENT STUDENTS
Geneva vocalists perform well at Tri-State competition
Five music majors competed against peers from PA, OH and WV.
ARTS & CULTURE
Geneva Reading Series: Nostalgia
Literary and musical talent will be on display on Wed., Nov. 19 at 7 p.m.
ATHLETICS
Cornuet remembers brother with help from football
Reprinted with permission from the Beaver County Times.
ATHLETICS
Athletic Department adds three programs
Geneva’s list of varsity sports expands to include Men’s and Women’s Golf and Men’s Tennis.