Geneva College

 

 

Biology Course Descriptions

BIO 100 Transition to College Biology (1)
This course is designed to aid first semester freshmen biology majors in their transition from high school science to college biology. Study skills, Christian perspective and vocation will be emphasized. Fall semester, every year.

BIO 101 Topics in Biology (3)
An in-depth examination of one biological topic that varies from semester to semester. Fulfills part of the natural science requirement for graduation but does not give credit toward a major in biology. Repeatable. Every semester.

BIO 111 Introduction to Environmental Biology (4)
An introduction to biology as a science; biological principles that operate in populations, communities and ecosystems; and principles of animal behavior. Natural selection and life origins are also discussed. Laboratory emphasizes application of the scientific method, classification of animals, and writing in the biological sciences. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Fall semester.

BIO 112 Introduction to Cellular Biology (4)
An introduction to the biological principles that operate at the cellular and molecular levels of organization. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Spring semester. Prerequisites: CHM 111 or permission of the instructor.

BIO 204 Botany (4)
Introduction to plant structure, function, and diversity. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Fall semester, alternate years. Next offered, Fall 2009. Prerequisites: BIO 111 and BIO 112 or permission of the instructor.

BIO 210 ID and Evolution (3)
This course explores the debate between the proponents of Intelligent Design (ID) and the defenders of Darwinian Evolution, by reading and discussing compelling publications written by each camp. Fall semester, alternate years.

BIO 218 Introduction to Nutrition (3)
An introduction to the major types of nutrients needed by humans, their utilization by the body, the consequences of their deficiencies, and their sources. Nutritional principles are applied through the life cycle. Spring semester, alternate years. Prerequisite: BIO 112.

BIO 225 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4)
An introduction to gross anatomy and microscopic anatomy, as well as the function and regulation of the organ systems of the human body. Both systemic and regional approaches to learning anatomy will be used. Fall semester. Prerequisite: BIO 112 or permission of the instructor.

BIO 226 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4)
This course focuses on the physiological regulation of human body homeostasis. The first segment covers neuronal and endocrine signal pathways vital to intercellular communication and regulation. Subsequently, regulation of homeostasis in a variety of stress and disease states is presented. In the laboratory, the student will perform actual experiments using physiological recording techniques. Students are challenged to integrate their knowledge of physiology with their theological and philosophical views of human nature and personhood. Spring semester. Prerequisites: BIO 112 and BIO 225.

BIO 302 Embryology (4)
Analysis of all stages of embryonic development, touching on underlying mechanisms. Focus is on mammalian development in lectures; fish and chick embryonic development in lab. Ethical issues involving human embryos are also discussed. Fall semester, alternate years. Next offered, Fall 2009. Prerequisites: BIO 112 and BIO 225, or permission of the instructor.

BIO 305 Microbiology (4)
An introduction to the various types of microorganisms and representative human microbial infections. Also includes principles of infectious disease and host responses to infection. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Spring semester. Prerequisite: BIO 112.

BIO 306 General Ecology (4)
Principles describing the interactions of organisms with their living and non-living surroundings. Laboratories introduce field techniques. Three hours lecture and recitation; and three hours laboratory per week. Spring semester. Prerequisite: BIO 111.

BIO 315 Immunology (3)
A thorough study of the activities, interactions, and regulation of the immune system and its role in areas such as infections, transplants, tumors, and auto-immunity. Fall semester, alternate years. Prerequisite: BIO 225 or permission of the instructor.

BIO 316 Virology (3)
A study of the general mechanisms by which viruses cause disease followed by a survey of the major groups of human viruses and the infections and tumors which they cause. The diagnosis and treatment of viral infections are also discussed. Fall semester, alternate years. Prerequisite: BIO 112.

BIO 317 Biochemistry (3)
An introduction to biochemistry focusing on the structure and function of biological compounds. Topics include cellular structure, biological reactions, compartmentalization, water, amino acids, proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, and membranes/lipids. Three hours lecture per week. Fall semester. Prerequisite: CHM 222. Cross-listed as CHM 317.

BIO 319 Genetics (4)
A study of the inheritance, expression, and regulation of genes. Of particular interest is the relationship of these topics to human disease. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Fall semester. Prerequisites: BIO 112 and MAT 105 or PSY 205.

BIO 331 Biomedical Ethics (3)
A description and critique of the worldviews underlying humanistic and Biblical principles of ethics and the application of those principles to contemporary problems in health care and medical technology. Spring semester, alternate years. Prerequisite: biology major, junior status.

BIO 405 Molecular Biology (4)
An investigation into several of the hottest topics in molecular biology based on recent articles from biological journals. Particular areas of interest include intracellular sorting, signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, and cancer. The lab integrates techniques from biochemistry, cell biology, immunology, and molecular genetics. Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. Spring semester. Prerequisites: BIO 112 and BIO 319.

BIO 420 Senior Paper (1)
Development of a thesis which examines one topic in biology from a Christian worldview contrasted with a secular worldview. Grade of C- or better required for graduation. Every semester, limited enrollment. Prerequisite: biology major, senior status.

BIO 421 Advanced Genetics (3)
Focusing on current understanding of how genes and inheritance are involved in determining human disease. Particular attention will be paid to the evolving impact of the Human Genome Project (HGP) on our understanding of human molecular genetics, physiology, and the implications of medical treatment. The ethical, legal, and social implications of the HGP will be discussed and different worldviews contrasted with a Christian worldview. Spring semester, alternate years. Prerequisites: BIO 226, BIO 317 and BIO 319.

BIO 422 Neuroscience (4)
The course will teach the electrophysical, cellular, and molecular basis of neuronal signaling. This will serve as the foundation for understanding the neuroscientific bases of thought, mood, learning, memory, and selected diseases. The student will also be challenged to integrate current neuroscientific knowledge with their ethical, philosophical, and theological views of human nature. In the laboratory, the student will perform experiments in electrophysiology using crayfish neuron and muscle preparations. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Fall semester, alternate years. Next offered, Fall 2009. Prerequisites: BIO 226, BIO 319 and PHY 181.

For students interested in environmental biology, courses can also be taken at The AuSable Institute of Environmental Studies during the summer. These courses automatically transfer to Geneva. For a description of The AuSable Institute and a complete list of courses available, check their website at www.ausable.org.


 

Point of Excellence

The Department of Biblical Studies offers opportunities to study at Jerusalem University College or at the Covenanter Theological Institute in Airdrie, Scotland.

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